Applique Quilt Patterns

The word ‘Appliqué’ is derived from the French word ‘appliquer’, which implies to "put on". In the appliqué method, one sheet of material is positioned above another sheet of material and is stitched in that position. Appliqués release an entire new world of designs to the quilters setting aside a lot of extra opportunities rather than simply piecing.

A concise introduction to the various forms of appliqué involves understanding that t hese are intended to provide the trainee quilter with a little experience to the prospects of appliqué. A listing of excellent resource books for appliqué provides the quilter with a setting for an additional comprehensive coverage of the wide subject matter of appliqué.

Getting Fabrics Ready for Appliqué: Prior to affixing the pieces of the pattern to the supporting material, the pieces of material sketching the design should be cut out and arranged. This should be done with the intention of not revealing the unrefined boundaries. There are quite a lot of techniques that can be used to set up the design pieces. In addition to this there are plenty of techniques for fixing the pieces, which could be done by hand or by machine, whichever way is found the most appropriate.

Hand Basting (Hand or Machine Appliqué): This can be done by using a cardboard cutout. Simply trace the appliqué design to the exact area of the material. If preferred, even out the design pieces by continuous stitching. You could do this by hand or by using a machine, right in front of the sketched line. Trim just about 1/8" further from the marked line. With caution , shorten the material more or less to the line on curvatures and on spots within. Turn the unrefined border to the base of the design portion on the marked line and cautiously force it down with your finger. With the correct part of the material in front, stitch the unrefined border in its position, by hand secure it to the boundary and push the fabric evenly. Subsequent to affixing the design piece to the setting, get rid of the hand-stitched thread.

African American Culture African Culture Native American Culture

African Art
Fante of Ghana - Asafo Flags | Textiles & Symbols | Zulu Beadwork
African American Art
Art & Contemporary | Historical | Traditional
Asian Culture
Chinese | Hmong | Indian | Japanese | Korean | Tibetan | Afghanistan
Native American Culture
Hawaiians | Kuna of Panama (molas) | Mainland Tribes
Latin Culture / South American Culture Haitian Culture Aboriginal Culture
Australia / New Zealand