Hawaiian Quilt Patterns

The Hawaiian Quilt Patterns And Their Value

The Hawaiian quilt patterns are of significance because most of the quilt patterns from Hawaii have been made without any purpose working at the back of the creatorís mind. There are many quilt owners who dreamt of a certain quilt design and then turned it into reality.

Hawaiian quilt patterns somewhat symbolized a connection and a love for Hawaii that is shared by the people all over the world. There are quilts that have been named after the dead loved one of the quilt owners, who is believed to have moved on to a spiritual world. There are also Hawaiian quilts that have been essentially designed for marriage, for the unborn babies and for the celebration of the major Hawaiian events.

The patterns and designs

The Hawaiian quilt patterns usually reflect the objects of nature or any sentimental object. You can use an object from your home that had once belonged to a near and dear one. However, abiding by the rule, you will rarely find Hawaiian quilt patterns that have been based on humans or animals.

The making of the Hawaiian quilts

The use of the white thread is the only option that the Hawaiians have while weaving Hawaiian quilt patterns. Traditionally, the white thread was the only color thread that was available for a number of years. The quilts use of kapa (a natural fiber made from the flattening and pulping of bark) cloths that were dyed with vegetable and plant dyes, but the dyes were hardly used for dyeing the cottons and threads.

The Hawaiian women were quite efficient and did not waste the materials; thus, if a quilt was created with the wrong meaning and intention then it would be considered a waste.

The use of the Hawaiian quilts

Hawaiian quilt patterns were in memory of loved ones therefore, even if used at home they were never abused. If you had a quilt on the bed, it would be unlikely of you to sit on the quilt, on the contrary it was usual to pull up the edge of the quilt, fold it over and sit on the bed sheets. At night, you can sleep cozily under the quilt, but never on top of it. If you ever find it too warm to sleep under the quilt, make sure you remove the quilt from the bed and put it away properly.


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